10 Things You Can DIY With Corks







Big wine drinker? Have old cork coasters lying around? Well, save those corks because we have found 10 more ingenious ways to use them all around your house. Who knew something so simple can be so versatile!

1. Cork Magnets

Gather some magnet strips, a knife, glue, and some wine corks. Cut corks in half lengthwise and them apply adhesive on each magnet strip. Press firmly onto the flat side. And that’s all.

2. Drawer Knobs

Gather up some champagne corks, screws, and a screw driver. Remove existing drawer knobs and replace them with your pointed screws. Hold a screw in place with a screwdriver. Next, firmly press a champagne cork against the screw and twist in a clockwise motion. Do the same for all the drawers. Your new drawer knobs are ready.

3. Planters

You’ll need to gather up some potting soil, a puncher, paring knife, magnets and tiny succulents. Cut a hollow shape in the center of each cork. Attach magnets into each cork by pushing hard. Next, fill the hollow hole with soil and then place a tiny succulent inside each one. Add a few drops of water and attach the planters to a metal surface.

4. Jewelry Frame

Looking for ways to arrange your jewelry neatly? All you need is a frame that you like. Paint it. Cut out corks in long circular sizes and fuse into the frame. If you want to personalize it some more, you can wrap the corks in your favorite fabric.

5. Pinboard

All you need are cork tiles, white paint and brush, painter’s tape, and picture hanging strips. Apply the tape to the corks and proceed to make stripes. Next, arrange tiles in a pattern and then start painting. Finally, remove the tape and there you have it.

6. Mouse pad

All you have to do is cut cork to size then bond them together on top of a piece of thick cork paper. It’s better to keep it simple but you can design any shape you wish.

7. Cork Wall

Have you been looking for ways to spice up your kitchen? Is your kitchen backsplash too ordinary? Well no more. All you need is a piece of wood cut out to the exact size of the area you wish to cover up. Next, start gluing half-cut corks onto piece of wood until every inch is covered. You can opt to either try a pattern design or simply fasten them in a row formation. When the wood is completely covered, attach it to the wall and voila!

8. Pencil Holder

You’ll need a power drill, cork trivets, and glue. Stick trivets on top of each other and press firmly. Next, using your drill bit, drill out holes and fill each hole with a writing device.

9. Stool

You will need A LOT of wine and champagne corks. All you have to do is simply gather all your corks and enclose them in a breathable and durable mesh fabric.

10. Cork Stamps

Why not make cute and unique stamps with your corks? All you’ll need is a good knife, a sharpie and a bunch of corks. Next, draw whatever design you want and then simply cut around it and slowly chip away any excess wood. Use ink and fill in your designs and voila!

Some people believe that when the weather starts getting colder and the leaves start to fall, it is time to put away the gardening tools and wait until next spring to work on their garden again. Wrong.

Winter is an important time to maintain your garden's health and assure yourself a good crop for next year. You may think that might take too long to prepare your garden, but the truth is that it takes less than one day to prepare your garden for the upcoming winter. When the nighttime temperatures drop to less than forty-five degrees Fahrenheit for more than four days in a row, or frost is forecast for your area (usually around late October or November) you know its time to begin preparing your garden. You should begin by evaluating your garden design, check which plants grew well in the past season, and which plants did not do well.

Fall is a good time to decide which plants will remain in you garden next year, and which ones should go. It is also a good time to decide which new plants you want to grow. To make your garden more colorful and healthy, be sure only to plant the more hardy plants during the fall so that they can withstand the winter.

Some plants that will do fine being planted in fall are: rudbeckia, Aster Novi-belgii, Anemone Japonica, panicle hyandea, endive, escarole, and Brussels sprouts. You can find all of these and more in gardening magazines or your local nursery. After you have finished this you should begin cleaning up your garden. Begin by pulling out weeds that may have cropped up, and raking fallen leaves. Weeds and rotten leaves can carry insects and diseases that might be harmful to your garden. You should also rid your garden of spent annual plants, and harvest your vegetables and other plants that cannot withstand the winter weather.

After fall has come and gone, the leaves will be off your trees and you can see the rotten branches. Trimming off the unwanted branches from your trees isn't necessary to your gardens health, but may help later on by not dropping branches on your plants and not blocking too much of the sun. If you have younger trees you should consider wrapping them and supporting them with stakes to help them survive the winter wind and cold.

Putting mulch over your garden for the winter can be a helpful way to protect plants from sudden temperature changes and heavy snow. For mulch you can use about five inches of shredded bark, pine needles, or a variety of other materials. You have to be careful not to mulch too early, because some insects may still be alive and able to take shelter in it for the winter.

Once you are finished with your gardening tools you should clean them and make sure they are in a safe place where they won't rust and you know where they'll be for next year. Before winter comes you should always set out slug repellent, as slugs are one of the worst bugs to have in your garden. If you have a pool or fountain in your garden, be sure to take out any fish that you have in them and bring them inside. There's nothing sadder than a fish frozen in a block of ice.